Tagged: chicago

[Podcast] 2013 Year in Review

the city twitter icon - finalOver three podcasts, we revisit the year’s critical urban discussions on topics and ideas ranging from transportation along Vancouver’s Broadway corridor, the degradation of work in postindustrial urban economies, gentrification in Vancouver’s Chinatown, feminist urban futures and social movements, the making of Stanley Park, arts and cultural spaces, and much more.

In Part III of the 2013 Year in Review, former city councillor and Women Transforming Cities founder Ellen Woodsworth discusses the major issues from the past year.

Part I

Part II

Part III (featuring Ellen Woodsworth)

[Podcast] Degraded Work and Inequality in the North American City

degraded

Marc Doussard discusses how deteriorating employment conditions in the North American city are directly related to urban inequality

Listen here.

Does the growth of service sector jobs in North American cities inevitably lead to greater urban inequality? What are the implications of deteriorating job quality in our cities? How can organizers, workers, and policymakers challenge the degradation of work?

On the podcast, Marc Doussard discusses his recent book, Degraded Work: The Struggle at the Bottom of the Labour Market, based on extensive field research in Chicago.

His 2013 book, published by the University of Minnesota Press, “details the deteriorating conditions of employment in local-serving industries immunized against international competition. The book builds on a long-term engagement with regional economic development, and challenges the assumption that low pay and poor working conditions are intrinsic characteristics of service-sector jobs.”

Marc Doussard is assistant professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

[Podcast] The Production and Penalization of the Precariat in the Neoliberal Age (Part II): Transformation of the Ghetto

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Wacquant PPC (Page 1)

This is the second podcast of a two-part series (listen to the first part), focusing on the transformation of the ghetto and the emergence of workfare and prisonfare under neoliberalism.

On November 1st, 2012, Loic Wacquant gave a public lecture organized by the University of British Columbia’s Liu Institute for Global Studies and the Department of Geography. His talk is entitled, “The Production and Penalization of the Precariat in the Neoliberal Age.”

Loic Wacquant is professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley and a researcher with the European Centre of Sociology and Political Science in Paris. He is the author of many books and articles, including Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced MarginalityPrisons of Poverty, and Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity.

 

[Podcast] The Production and Penalization of the Precariat in the Neoliberal Age (Part I)

https://thecityfm.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/the-production-and-penalization-of-the-precariat-in-the-neoliberal-age-part-i.mp3

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Wacquant's 2009 book Punishing the Poor.

Loic Wacquant is professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley and a researcher with the European Centre of Sociology and Political Science in Paris. His research focuses on comparative urban marginality with a focus on Chicago’s South Side and Paris’s racialized urban periphery. Wacquant’s research also looks at broader issues of urban poverty, ethno-racial domination, the penal state, and social theory. He is the author of many books and articles, including Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality, Prisons of Poverty, and Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity.

On November 1st, 2012, Loic Wacquant gave a public lecture organized by the University of British Columbia’s Liu Institute for Global Studies and the Department of Geography. His lecture is entitled, “The Production and Penalization of the Precariat in the Neoliberal Age.” This podcast is part one of a two-part series.

[Podcast] Small, Gritty, and Green: Agriculture and Relocalization in Smaller Cities

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Courtesy of The MIT Press.

Second part in a two-part series (part one available here). Do we privilege larger cities when we talk about a sustainable, low-carbon future?  Are smaller cities excluded from these conversations? Catherine Tumber, author of Small, Gritty, and Green: The Promise of America’s Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-Carbon World, argues that smaller industrial cities have an increasingly significant role to play in our low-carbon, relocalized urban futures.

In this podcast, Catherine Tumber focuses on the importance of agriculture for small industrial cities in relocalizing and strengthening local and regional economies – and ultimately wrestling power away from corporate agribusiness.

[Podcast] Chicago, Detroit, and the Evolution of the Occupy Movement

For half a century now, the top one percent of the top one percent have denied the right to the city, by confusing people that individual rights were all that mattered. They turned us all from citizens into consumers, and told everyone that you have the freedom to choose what music to listen to, what television shows to watch, what low-wage job to accept or what good job to compete against a hundred other applicants, what tiny basement suite or SRO to rent if you can’t afford anything better. But you’re told that when it comes to the true right to the city, you only get a few small choices every few years. And these choices will always have to get prior approval from the 1 percent, and the financial markets, and the real estate markets, before we’re even allowed to make any choice at all.

Demand more. Demand the right to the city. It belongs to all of us.

–Elvin Wyly (in an excerpt from To Claim the Right to the City, Turn Left)

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Photo by Elvin Wyly (2010). Available at http://www.geog.ubc.ca/~ewyly/imaginer.html.

The urban Occupy movement began in September 2011, and it continues to evolve. On the program, urban geographer Elvin Wyly talks about the Occupy movement as collectively claiming a right to the city – a right to live in just cities that are socially and economically equitable.

We then speak with an organizer from Occupy the Midwest, which is a Detroit conference drawing people from midwest cities and beyond. We discuss the socio-economic contexts of Chicago and Detroit, and this regional Occupy conference as part of the evolution of the movement in a part of the country particularly devastated by neoliberal capitalism.

May 22 Podcast // Cities and the End of Economic Growth

The May 22nd podcast focuses primarily on discussions of economic growth and the role of cities. In the first part of the program, you’ll hear an update on Musqueam’s struggle to protect their burial grounds and coverage on protests in Montreal and Chicago, as well as the Women Transforming Cities launch event (May 24th). In the second part of the show, The City contrasts the neoliberal, pro-growth urban economic paradigm espoused by Harvard’s Edward Glaeser (a belief held by the majority of neoclassical economists) versus Richard Heinberg‘s (Post Carbon Institute; author, The End of Growth) end-of-growth thesis, accounting for the incompatibility of constant economic expansion and our finite planet.