Tagged: dtes

[Podcast] No Place to Go: Gentrifying Downtown Eastside Residential Hotels Increasingly Unaffordable for Low-Income Residents

Screen shot 2014-03-12 at 4.58.25 PM

Seven hundred and thirty-one homeless people live in the Downtown Eastside (DTES) according to the City of Vancouver. Approximately 5,000 more live on the edge of homelessness in tiny Single Room Occupancy (SRO) hotel rooms, with no private kitchen or bathroom, and often poor management, mice, rats, cockroaches and bedbugs. Most of these people rely on welfare and basic pension and desperately need new self contained social housing.     –Carnegie Community Action Project

The Carnegie Community Action Project’s (CCAP) 2014 hotel and housing report finds that SROs in the DTES are more expensive than ever and that fewer still are available to low-income individuals looking for rooms.

On the podcast, I speak with Rory Sutherland, who is co-author of the report, No Place to Go: Losing Affordable Housing and Community. In the conversation, Rory outlines the major findings of the report, how they know SROs are gentrifying, and the implications for homelessness if this ‘last stop’ housing stock no longer houses the low-income people that depend on it.

[Podcast] 2013 Year in Review

the city twitter icon - finalOver three podcasts, we revisit the year’s critical urban discussions on topics and ideas ranging from transportation along Vancouver’s Broadway corridor, the degradation of work in postindustrial urban economies, gentrification in Vancouver’s Chinatown, feminist urban futures and social movements, the making of Stanley Park, arts and cultural spaces, and much more.

In Part III of the 2013 Year in Review, former city councillor and Women Transforming Cities founder Ellen Woodsworth discusses the major issues from the past year.

Part I

Part II

Part III (featuring Ellen Woodsworth)

[Podcast] A Cultural Capital? Reflections From Vancouver’s Top Arts & Culture Bureaucrat

The dollars are limited and we have other support mechanisms, but ultimately, if it comes down to dollars, that’s going to end at some point. The city will continue its strong support for arts and culture, but can’t make up for the other levels of government. It is a challenge.

–Richard Newirth, Vancouver’s Managing Director of Cultural Services

Subscribe to the podcast to have it automatically downloaded to iTunes or stream it below.

Vancouver’s top arts bureaucrat. Courtesy of Alliance for Arts and Culture.

The City discusses the state of arts and culture with Vancouver’s Managing Director of Cultural Services Richard Newirth, covering everything from liquor regulations, funding, the demise of Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company, affordable arts space, the eastward movement of artists within the city, and much more.

You can find more information about the plans, programs, and initiatives of the City of Vancouver’s Cultural Services here.

[Podcast] From Poor to Yuppie: Artists, Boutiques, and Neighbourhood Change

Why do aestheticized urban landscapes attract higher income groups? What role do artists and boutiques play in neighbourhood class transformation?

“Creative people need creative space.” Photo taken in San Francisco’s SoMa district by Andy Longhurst.

On this week’s edition of The City, we critically evaluate the connections between artists, galleries and boutiques, city policy, and processes of neighbourhood change. Artists have long been implicated in processes of neighbourhood socio-economic upgrading, and their preferred locational choice of affordable, (lower-income) inner-city neighbourhoods is implicated in early stages of major neighbourhood class transformation. We examine how artists and cultural workers themselves view these processes, the role of city planning policy, and the potential barriers to gentrification.

The City critically unpacks these issues from the following perspectives:

You can subscribe to the podcast and have it downloaded automatically to iTunes – or listen from the audio player below.

[Show Preview] From Poor to Yuppie: Artists, Boutiques, and Neighbourhood Change

Do aestheticized urban landscapes always attract higher income groups?

On this week’s edition of The City, we’ll critically evaluate the connections between artists, galleries and boutiques, city policy, and processes of neighbourhood change. Artists have long been implicated in processes of neighbourhood social-economic upgrading, and their preferred locational choice of affordable, (lower-income) inner-city neighbourhoods is implicated in early stages of major neighbourhood class transformation. We’ll look at how artists and cultural workers themselves view these processes, the role of city planning policy, and the potential barriers to gentrification.

The City speaks with the following people to critically examine these issues:

  • Tarah Hogue (Curator, Gam Gallery)
  • Richard Newirth (Director, Cultural Services, City of Vancouver)
  • Dr. Harvey Molotch (Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and Sociology, New York University)
  • Wendy Pedersen (Carnegie Community Action Project)

Here’s a preview of the upcoming episode, featuring Sharon Zukin (Sociologist, City University of New York) (via BigThink.com) and Tarah Hogue (Curator, Gam Gallery in the Downtown Eastside).

Author and Activist Jean Swanson on the Cost of Poverty // Future of Social Housing

In the first part of the program, I speak with anti-poverty activist (Carnegie Community Action Project and Raise the Rates), former COPE mayoral candidate, and author (Poor Bashing: The Politics of ExclusionJean Swanson. We discuss, among other things, an upcoming event, The Cost of Poverty.

In the second half, we hear highlights from the June 16th panel discussion on The Future of Social Housing: From Little Mountain to Heather Place, organized by the Vancouver Renters’ Union, featuring Barry Growe (Community Advocates for Little Mountain), Maria Wallstam (Vancouver Renters’ Union), Elvin Wyly (Professor, UBC Geography), and Richard Marquez (former San Francisco community activist). The entire panel discussion will be made available soon.

You can subscribe to The City and have the weekly podcast downloaded to iTunes automatically.

June 5 Podcast // Media Representations of DTES Sex Workers // Urban Scholar David Harvey on Rebel Cities

In the June 5th podcast, Vancouver Night School‘s Jamie Kendall-Ward discusses media representations of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside sex workers, and in the second part of the show, leading critical urban geographer David Harvey discusses his most recent book, Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, with Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman.

MUSIC // Language City, Wolf Parade (Montreal) // Living for the City, Stevie Wonder

April 24th Podcast // DTES Sequel 138 Condo Development Approved // Urban Soundscapes and Children’s Health

You can find the April 24th podcast here, and don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast and have it download to iTunes or your podcatcher automatically. In the first half of the show, Ivan Drury discusses the City of Vancouver’s Development Permit Board’s approval of the Sequel 138 condo project on the Pantages Theatre site (which was recently demolished and you can find photos here) and what this project means for gentrification in the Downtown Eastside. Details of the application are available here, and please note that they are provided by the developer. You can also see a letter signed by 30 academics (many specializing in gentrification and urban studies) in opposition to the development below this post.  In the second half of the show, Iain Marjoribanks shares recent research on the effect of urban soundscapes on children’s health, contrasting the False Creek South and Marpole neighbourhoods.

GUESTS

30 professors speak out against Sequel condos on Pantages site in DTES

Many professors, primarily from the UBC and SFU Geography Departments, have spoken out against the proposed Sequel 138 condo development in the heart of the Downtown Eastside on the Pantages Theatre site at East Hastings and Main Street. They are expressing serious concerns over how this development will continue to gentrify the neighbourhood and put upward pressure on rents and ultimately push low-income residents out.