Tagged: real estate

[Podcast] Vancouver: Consumption City Forever?

Photo by Andy Longhurst

Photo by Andy Longhurst

Part two of the conversation with urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki about Vancouver’s future economic trajectory

On the program, the second part of the conversation with urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki about Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption, dominated increasingly by real estate and tourism. We discuss what the future might hold for Vancouver as a city of consumption – and whether it might be advantageous for the city to chart an alternative economic path forward.

Dr. Elliot Siemiatycki is a postdoctoral fellow at York University in Toronto, and he completed his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2013. His PhD research examined Vancouver’s urban economic transformation over the last three decades in his dissertation – Consumption City: Precarious Labour and Capital in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

[Podcast] Vancouver: Consumption City

DSC08432

Trump Tower Vancouver construction. Photo by Andy Longhurst.

Economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki discusses Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption

Never miss an episode! Subscribe to the podcast here to receive a weekly automatic download.

Above all, the many paradoxes of Vancouver’s contemporary economic development trajectory are exposed in the words of local workers, firms, commentators and industry experts: Vancouver is simultaneously the most livable and unaffordable city in the world; Vancouver is a leading creative city in which creative firms and workers alike struggle under conditions of precariousness; Vancouver is mythologized as a healthy, sustainable, lifestyle city while these very qualities often must be sacrificed by working Vancouver residents. Tracing the underlying story and challenges of Vancouver’s emergence as a global consumption city provides important insights into 21st century urban development.                           –Elliot Siemiatycki, PhD

On the podcast, urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki discusses Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption, dominated increasingly by real estate and tourism. We examine how the city’s structure, feel, and image of itself have shifted over the last three decades – and how the rise of precarious employment is implicated in this transformation.

Dr. Elliot Siemiatycki is a postdoctoral fellow at York University in Toronto, and he completed his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2013. His PhD research examined Vancouver’s urban economic transformation over the last three decades in his dissertation – Consumption City: Precarious Labour and Capital in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

[Podcast] Chinatown: The Next Yaletown? // Vancouver Loses Independently-Owned Festival Cinemas

Screenshot of the Keefer Block condo development (www.keeferblock.com).

“Condo for sale minutes from downtown.” Screenshot taken from keeferblock.com.

Social mix is a euphemism for destroying low-income communities. This is a community that fought for – and won – the only safe injection site in North America. This is a community that had to occupy a Police Board meeting in order to get the Police Board to put out the same reward for the missing women that it put out for garage robberies on the Westside. This is a community that had to fight for seven years to get a community centre like other people have. This is a community that had to camp out on a beach for a whole summer in order to get a waterfront park like other communities have. This community has a history of fighting for human rights, and the City destroys that by condo-fying the whole [neighbourhood] and displacing low income people – that will be destroying one of the most valuable assets it has.

–Jean Swanson, Carnegie Community Action Project

Subscribe via iTunes to have the weekly podcast downloaded automatically.

Vancouver’s Chinatown is undergoing increasingly rapid gentrification. The Carnegie Community Action Project’s Jean Swanson (author, Poorbashing: The Politics of Exclusion) discusses why a significant influx of condominiums and high-end retail  are threatening to displace the neighbourhood’s low-income residents – and why the city is approving these major developments before the completion of the Downtown Eastside local area plan. You can check out a past podcast, From Poor to Yuppie: Artists, Boutiques, and Neighbourhood Change, if you are interested in hearing more about gentrification and social dislocation in the Downtown Eastside.

On the second half of the program, we hear why the independently-owned Festival Cinemas has been sold to Cineplex. We talk with co-owner Leonard Schein about why he is calling it quits, the challenge to operate cinemas independently, and what he believes the City and province should do to help arts and culture thrive/survive in Vancouver.

[Podcast] The Working City: Future of Vancouver’s Economy

Subscribe via iTunes to have the weekly podcast downloaded automatically.

Looking west down the North Arm of the Fraser River from the Queensborough Bridge in New Westminister.(Photo by A. Longhurst)

Looking west down the North Arm of the Fraser River from the Queensborough Bridge in New Westminister. (Photo by A. Longhurst)

Is Vancouver on track to become a resort town with a real estate-dependent economy with an overabundance of low-wage service jobs? Are we on track to be a hub for transportation, technology, and value-added industries? How do highly uncertain global economic and climate forecasts play into Vancouver’s economic outlook?

On this podcast, we continue the ongoing series, The Working City (listen to Part I), examining urban economic landscapes and the future of economic development. We hear three of perspectives on the future of Vancouver’s regional economy, including Bryn Davidson, a laneway house developer, Marc Lee, an economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and Shane Simpson, a BC NDP MLA for Vancouver-Hastings. This discussion was recorded at the 2012 UBC School of Community and Regional Planning Symposium in February 2012.

[Podcast] The Working City: Urban Economies, Industrial Displacement, and the Global City

Cities like New York have embraced the global city moniker as central to their identity and have fostered those economic sectors that city leaders understand as being congruent with this designation. Financial and producer services and the arts economy, signals of global cityhood, have become vital to New York’s self-image. Economic sectors that do not fit with the image of a global city suffer through a policy of malign neglect.

–Professors Winifred Curran and Susan Hanson

Subscribe via iTunes to have the weekly podcast downloaded automatically.

DSC_0152

The Brooklyn industrial landscape. A view from the Bushwick neighbourhood looking towards the Manhattan skyline. Photo by A. Longhurst.

In the first podcast of an ongoing series exploring urban economies, The City talks with urban geographer Winifred Curran about industrial displacement in New York City, the future of economic development in North American cities, and the assumed inevitability of deindustrialization and the post-industrial urban economy.

What type of industries prosper in particular places? Why? And what are some of the pressures industries face in a globalized economy and in so-called global cities?

Dr. Winifred Curran is associate professor of geography at DePaul University in Chicago. She is an urban geographer focusing on gentrification and urban change, labor geographies, and race and gender. Her dissertation work looked at the effect of gentrification on small scale manufacturers in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn. Her current research looks at the connections between gentrification and environmentalism. She has been published in the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Local Environment, Urban Geography, and Urban Studies, among others.

[Podcast] In Conversation: Vancouver Councillor Andrea Reimer Talks Housing and Engagement

Subscribe to the podcast to have it automatically downloaded to iTunes or stream it above.

The City talks with Vision Vancouver Councillor Andrea Reimer as we mark one year since 2011 municipal election.

Andrea Reimer was first elected in 2002 as a School Board member with the Green Party, she joined Vision Vancouver and was elected to City Council in 2008. Councillor Reimer was appointed in 2008 as the Chair of the City’s Planning and Environment Committee and Council lead on the Greenest City Action Plan, overseeing Vancouver’s efforts to become the greenest city in the world by 2020. Along with six other Vision councillors and Mayor Gregor Robertson, Andrea Reimer was elected in the 2011 election to council. She is currently Chair of the Standing Committee on Planning, Transportation, and Environment and council liaison for the Greenest City Action Team. She is also a director at Metro Vancouver, and is appointed to the city’s Family Court / Youth Justice Committee, Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee, and Women’s Advisory Committee.

The City’s Andy Longhurst sat down with Councillor Reimer in July 2012 to talk at length about a number of issues, including neighbourhood engagement, which has come under fire in recent weeks. We also discuss the controversial Rize condo tower in Mount Pleasant, rental housing, affordability, and questions of how the city should continue to develop.

WEB-ONLY CONTENT | Hear more from Councillor Reimer (from the July 2012 interview) on whether green initiatives sideline social justice issues, and whether the City should be doing more to protect the many older single-family homes which are often demolished in Vancouver’s pricey real estate market.

On green initiatives vs. social justice concerns and the viaducts:

On renovictions, the loss of affordable rental stock, and the demolition of single-family homes: